A Historical, Genealogical Memoir  

by Marietta Stevens Crichlow and Linda Crichlow White

    

Jeraleen Peterson

Social Worker and "White family" cousin

San Bernardino, California

​Thank you for the great example of what to do

with our gifts after retirement. 


Konnetta Simons Alexander

Genealogist and one of our Warnick cousins

​Nashville, TN

​Website: http://grahamslaverecords.wix.com/graham-slave-records​

​What great stories you’ve shared. Your format, pics, and written words are totally delight. Best family book I’ve seen and enjoyed.



John Muller

Associate Librarian, Special Collections

D.C. Public Library

and author of Frederick Douglass, The Lion of Anacostia

​BLOG

Back There, Then is very professionally done and could be a great book talk / presentation for others who have compiled extensive family research but haven't taken the next step towards publication.

Throughout the narrative education, faith, and family figure prominently. The primary source materials of certificates, photographs, and church programs bring the reader into world of the Crichlow family while on the campus of Howard University, funeralizing a loved one, welcoming a baby or dealing with day to day life.  In this work we see ourselves reflected in human possibility and our potential evident in the growth of a successful American family living as African American citizens. 

Ida Jones, Ph.D.

Assistant Curator

Manuscript Division

Moorland Spingarn Research Center

​Howard University

Charles Howard

​AAHGS Immediate Past National President and James Dent Walker Chapter President

One of the greatest tributes we can pay our ancestors is to document their life story.  Linda Crichlow White, Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, Inc., James Dent Walker Chapter member, has done a masterful job in collecting, preserving and sharing her mother's story.  Thru sheer determination her mom not only documented her life but placed the people, places and events of her lifetime in context.  In a sense we are who our parents made us.  Telling our family story is an important part of understanding the history of African-ancestored people, families and community life.  Linda is blessed that her mom told her story and that it can now be shared.

Robert A. Hill, PhD.

Research Professor of History

and Editor-in-Chief, The Marcus Garvey & UNIA Papers, James S. Coleman African Studies Center,

University of California,
​Los Angeles

Though African American history may still be largely hidden from mainstream American history, the memories contained herein lay bare for us a world that is ever present to this people, a world of their own making, a world that is never weary but shows clearly what is possible when a people take responsibility for their lives.


Back There, Then gives not only the details of their dates and places of birth and professional occupation, but also their education, places of worship, family residences and social and recreational activities.  Cumulatively, it weaves the fabric out of which lives were built, community was formed and a tradition of hard work was generated.  As a historian, I am awed by the dedication and devotion that is manifest throughout.  Most of all I am thankful.  I applaud and salute Mother Marietta and Linda Marie and all those who made possible this work, one that is not just for today, but for the ages, and for all who continue to struggle to achieve in this land.

Rev. Joseph Evans, PhD

Pastor in Mount Carmel Baptist Church
Washington, DC

Marietta Stevens Crichlow’s daughter, Linda White, has compiled a remarkable monograph based on her mother’s stories and memorabilia.  A family story of perseverance, faith, and hard work, Mrs. Crichlow’s history is part of the rich Mt. Carmel legacy.